THE LEGEND is the Main Attraction at Every Event

miami-international-boat-show“THE LEGEND” Opened the 2016 Miami International Boat Show Making Tidal Waves at Its First Event Ever Since the 1980’s Hit TV Series “Miami Vice”

Miami Vice is the show that created an iconic style, set the standards in music for the 80’s and developed a huge fan base. We want the excitement of Miami Vice to continue on, and we know it still exists through the many fans.

We are happy to announce that David Martino has proudly brought back the original Miami Vice Fast Boat, the Scarab 38KV to the turquoise waters of Miami. The fast boat, one of the most recognizable boats in Miami is still in museum quality condition. Documented by Wellcraft and Universal Studios, the boat immediately turns heads and is easily recognized by fans of Miami Vice.

We had the opportunity to showcase the legendary fast boat at the Miami International Boat Show in February. It was a huge opportunity for us to meet the fans of Miami Vice, and show off the flawless and magnificent original Miami Vice Scarab 38KV. We were also very fortunate to have Oliva Brown, one of the original cast members of the show who played Trudy, attend the show with us. She signed autographs and took photos with fans. We also had the Ferrari from the T.V. show there as well, which fans were really excited about. The show was an overnight success, and it was the first event for both the boat and David Martino with the Miami International Boat Show.

INTERVIEWS WITH INTERNATIONAL STAR DAVE MARTINO

Click links below to view exciting international interviews!

ANOTHER BLOCKBUSTER EVENT AT SUPER INTERNATIONAL BOAT RACE 2016

More than 30 years after it zoomed and sped through Miami waters, the Wellcraft Scarab 38-foot KV boat — aka the “Miami Vice” boat — is back. Nicknamed “the Legend,” its owner David Martino of Miami brought the boat to Brevard this weekend for the seventh annual Thunder on Cocoa Beach, Space Coast Superboat Grand Prix. Before Sunday’s races at the Cocoa Beach Pier, the boat had “face time” with fans young and old at various events tied to Thunder on Cocoa Beach.

“It’s a great city,” Martino said of Cocoa Beach. “People are really friendly and very laid back.”

Since Martino bought the boat for an undisclosed sum just over a year ago, he’s been getting multiple calls for special appearances. “We have to be really selective, but the boat is available for select events and charities,” he said.

He was invited to be part of the Thunder on the Beach festivities, and Fishlips Waterfront Bar and Grill at Port Canaveral was a principal sponsor. In addition to Thunder on the Beach, Martino said the Legend made a stop to an assisted-living facility in Cocoa Beach. “It’s amazing how people relate to the ‘Miami Vice’ boat. They say, ‘this is my favorite show.’ “

Don Johnson’s character, James “Sonny” Crockett, used the Wellcraft Scarab during the hit ’80s show, which ran for five seasons from 1984-90. The Scarab was used in seasons two through five. On occasion, Martino sports a Don Johnson/”Miami Vice”-like outfit. “I’m not trying to impersonate him,” the super fan said of the actor. But sporting the clothes and owning the boat brings back a lot of nostalgic feelings for that era.

A “Miami Vice” reunion with original cast members is in the works. Martino and other organizers are shooting for November in — where else? — Miami.

“It’s an extremely valuable boat,” he said of the Legend. “It’s priceless, it’s like a fine piece of artwork.”

After 30 Years, Miami Vice is Still Resonating Internationally

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Thirty years ago, the cops-versus-drug-lords melodrama “Miami Vice” — starring Don Johnson, left, and Philip Michael Thomas, right, as as undercover narcs Sonny Crockett and Rico Tubbs — debuted on NBC-TV. The show’s producers cast a hyper-Miami as a principal character that even locals had trouble recognizing.

Thirty years ago, the cops-versus-drug-lords melodrama “Miami Vice” — starring Don Johnson, left, and Philip Michael Thomas, right, as as undercover narcs Sonny Crockett and Rico Tubbs — debuted on NBC-TV. The show’s producers cast a hyper-Miami as a principal character that even locals had trouble recognizing.

BY ANDRES VIGLUCCI

It’s the very first Miami sequence in Miami Vice, the TV show that radically reconfigured the city’s shattered image. Don Johnson, resplendent as undercover narc Sonny Crockett in white suit, sockless espadrilles and turquoise T-shirt, rides to an ill-fated drug deal in the back seat of a burgundy Eldorado convertible along a sunbleached Ocean Drive.

Exactly 30 years ago, the eeriest thing about the scenery is probably not the shabby state of the Art Deco hotels, but the emptiness. There’s no one around: hardly anyone on the sidewalk, not a soul at the Clevelander, not a cafe umbrella in sight.

“Miami Vice” used The Carlyle Hotel on Miami Beach as a set for the television show in the 1980’s. Here is the hotel as it was in 1985. The show helped save South Beach by broadcasting the architectural charms of its long-neglected Deco hotels to millions around the globe at a time when city fathers wanted nothing more than to tear it all down for condos.

“Miami Vice” used The Carlyle Hotel on Miami Beach as a set for the television show in the 1980’s. Here is the hotel as it was in 1985. The show helped save South Beach by broadcasting the architectural charms of its long-neglected Deco hotels to millions around the globe at a time when city fathers wanted nothing more than to tear it all down for condos.

Crockett could have fired a TEC-9 up Ocean Drive and not hit a thing.

The rolling set-piece is a telling reminder of just how far Miami and Miami Beach have come since Vice made its NBC-TV debut in September 1984, at a moment when the cities’ fortunes — reeling from a devastating race riot, the Mariel boatlift, a Haitian refugee influx, white flight, the rise of the drug cartels and an explosion in violent crime — seemed about sunk for good.

But it also provides an early gleaning of the magical Miami Vice formula, which left a lasting effect not just on TV and films, but also, indelibly, on its downtrodden hometown. The show’s producers cannily recast a hyper-Miami as a principal character in their cops-versus-drug-lords melodrama — a sizzling cool, sexy, multiethnic, multiracial, exciting place, at once gritty and gorgeous — that even locals had trouble recognizing.

It’s a remarkable trajectory, from South Beach flophouses to $1,000-a-night rooms at the Setai, that Miami Vice played no small role in launching. The show not only helped save South Beach, broadcasting the architectural charms of its long-neglected Deco hotels and apartment houses to millions around the globe at a time when city fathers wanted nothing more than to tear it all down for condos, Miami Vice practically invented the idea of South Beach.

To read more of The Miami Herald’s article, click here.

WORKING TOWARDS AN OFFICIAL MIAMI VICE REUNION FOR 2016

For Martino, it’s about keeping the spirit of the show alive. He is passionate about the boat, but it’s the excitement and passion for Miami Vice that means a lot to him. With the success of the Miami International Boat Show, and the passion Martino has for Miami Vice, he is excited to announce that he and his team will be working diligently toward an official Miami Vice reunion in November 2016, in Florida. Miami Vice is celebrating its 30th anniversary, and now that the boat is back home in Miami, it’s Martino’s wish to make this happen.

OUR PROUD MIAMI VICE FAST BOAT SPONSORS

 
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FishLips

For more information on sponsorship benefits and other packages, please contact David Martino at 954-560-2466 or complete the following form.

Be part of the reason the reunion takes place!